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Star Trek III - The Search for Spock (Two-Disc Special Collector's Edition)
Known as: Star Trek III - The Search for Spock
Online Status: Owned on UV
Price at time of addition: Unknown
Category: COLLECTION
Rating: PG (Parental Guidance Suggested)
Running Time: 105 minutes
Studio: Paramount
Theater Release Date: 1984-06-01
Origional Release Date: 1984-06-01
Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1 (Widescreen)
Language: English,French
Subtitles: English
Dubbed:
Director:
ID: 58
ASIN: B00006G8HX
UPC: 097360625547
EAN: 9780792182481
MPN:
Date last watch:
Date Added: 2010-07-26
Actors:
William Shatner
Phil Morris

Genra:
Horror / Sci-Fi / Fantasy
Sci-Fi/Fantasy
Science Fiction
Format:
Anamorphic
Closed-captioned
Color
Dolby
DVD
Subtitled
Widescreen
NTSC


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Amazon.com
You didn't think Mr. Spock was really dead, did you? When Spock's casket landed on the surface of the Genesis planet at the end of Star Trek II, we had already been told that Genesis had the power to bring "life from lifelessness." So it's no surprise that this energetic but somewhat hokey sequel gives Spock a new lease on life, beginning with his rebirth and rapid growth as the Genesis planet literally shakes itself apart in a series of tumultuous geological spasms. As Kirk is getting to know his estranged son (Merritt Butrick), he must also do battle with the fiendish Klingon Kruge (Christopher Lloyd), who is determined to seize the power of Genesis from the Federation. Meanwhile, the regenerated Spock returns to his home planet, and Star Trek III gains considerable interest by exploring the ceremonial (and, of course, highly logical) traditions of Vulcan society. The movie's a minor disappointment compared to Star Trek II, but it's a--well, logical--sequel that successfully restores Spock (and first-time film director Leonard Nimoy) to the phenomenal Trek franchise...as if he were ever really gone. With Kirk's willful destruction of the U.S.S. Enterprise and Robin Curtis replacing the departing Kirstie Alley as Vulcan Lt. Saavik, this was clearly a transitional film in the series, clearing the way for the highly popular Star Trek IV. --Jeff Shannon
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